News » POSTED 29.05.2017

PRS June 2017 - Examination timetable

Image: Simon Pendal, Entrainment: an architecture of feeling and thinking. PRS Public Examination, October 2016. Photo: RMIT School of Architecture & Design

 

The Practice Research Symposium (PRS) is a twice-yearly gathering of research candidates enrolled at RMIT in disciplines associated with Architecture and Design.

EXAMINATIONS
Please note there will be no late entries after the examination start times. 

Wednesday 31 May 2017

Kathy Waghorn
PhD Architecture & Design
The Practice of Feeling for Place: a compendium for an expanded architecture
10.30am
Audience to arrive by 10.15am. Strictly no entry after 10.30am
Project Room 1, Level 2

The practice of feeling for place proceeds from a hunch that a correspondence between art and architecture might expand the field of architecture through foregrounding the complexity of place. Activating knowing-through-practising, I fashion an experimental self as an agile figure who moves across and between art and architecture, amateur and expert, outsider and local. This experimental self cultivates a practico-social-spatial energetics, catalysing situations and influencing others to invoke feeling for place as a political, ethical and aesthetic task.

This practice finds allegiances as it rubs up against the attributes and procedures of socially engaged art and alongside those who pursue critical spatial practices. From the practice I identify tactical ways of operating that expand the architectural field by embracing time, process and subjectivity. Taking up the unexpected roles and positions that emerge in this expanded field I encourage a pedagogic disposition towards ‘paying attention’ and ‘piecing together’ as I draw on forms of agency to intervene in or coalesce place assemblages.

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Penny Allan
PhD Architecture & Design
Feeling Indeterminate: the experience and design of big landscapes
2.30pm
Audience to arrive by 2.15pm. Strictly no entry after 2.30pm
Project Room 1, Level 2

A fundamental challenge for landscape architects is the need to deal with landscape in a constant state of transformation. In the last two decades, an entire sub discipline has grown around documenting and designing with and for this complex condition. Most approaches are concerned with mapping flux and deal with landscape systems from a regional perspective. But the complexity of large-scale landscape systems can be overwhelming, and it is difficult to shift perspective from the very big to the human scale, which leaves human experience largely unaccounted for in these approaches.

In this PhD, I propose an alternative perspective. Against the discipline’s focus on process, my work is concerned with experience, specifically with how big landscapes feel. I am interested in what kinds of knowledge and sensibilities can be extracted through the direct experience of complex landscapes. From the examination of my own body of work and the select work of others, I distil and test three strategies to make the central notion of ‘how landscape feels’, operational.  I discover two things: that the experience of big landscapes makes tangible a sense of indeterminacy which abstract mapping misses entirely. and furthermore, that this feeling of indeterminacy is the foundation of human agency and adaptation.

Thursday 1 June 2017

Scott Elliott
PhD Architecture & Design
In Pursuit of Puzzlement: How architecture can pose questions
10am
Audience to arrive by 9.45am. Strictly no entry after 10am
Project Room 1, Level 2

Through building site-specific architectural interventions, this PhD develops an artistic practice that draws out puzzlement and tentativeness in the relationships between body and architecture. This research proposes that posing spatial questions through the construction of puzzling environments and interventions allows an open-ended engagement with surroundings to develop over time.

Rather than questioning rhetorically through language and reflection, questions are posed through the space and materials of engagement, by extending elements from a given architectural environment that becomes inflected and destabilised. These extensions create material encounters that begin to reveal the contingent relations between body and architecture. Rather than foreclosing with conclusions, the aim is to generate a puzzlement that opens up the potential for reconstructing body-architecture interdependencies.

This doctoral research, conducted through artistic practice, occurs within the field of architectural art installations, and is informed by specific lineages in art practice and philosophy that explore relations between body and architecture. It offers a contribution to art practices that engage with architecture, and proposes how art can intervene into and inflect our relationship with built surroundings to not only reveal contingencies between body and architecture, but also open up potentials for rethinking and recasting this relationship.

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Kate Church
PhD Architecture & Design
Embracing Imminence: land...scapes and the peculiar distance
2.30pm
Audience to arrive by 2.15pm. Strictly no entry after 2.30pm
Project Room 1, Level 2

Embracing Imminence casts a realigned landscape practice into the temporal lag immediately preceding the Anthropocene’s official ratification, anticipating the conceptual and disciplinary implications of this epoch. Just as the last bastion of the ground’s metaphoric stability is jettisoned, it must shed its associations of solidity, homogeneity and stasis. Geologic signifiers of perpetual and serial change are apprehended through the research as harbingers of a likely near-future landscape condition. Through modes of plotting, gleaning and fabricating, I explore the mobility and flux of the land in relation to the geological agency of the body.

Each mode ‘grasps for’ and suspends the dynamic, entangled conditions of the restless body and the shifting ground as an expanded practice of making. Collectively, these modes of practice modulate, waylay and ‘hold open’ a relation to imminence.

Encountered here as a practicescape the modes capture shifts that are perceivable in a human lifetime, as opposed to the geological epochs by which most geomorphological changes are registered. This augurs a research terrain which is simultaneously horizontal, geologic and durational…

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Simon Twose
PhD Architecture & Design
Drawing/building/cloud/      sfumato practice as an open work
2.30pm
Audience to arrive by 2.15pm. Strictly no entry after 2.30pm
Project Room 2, Level 2

This PhD is an exploration into practice as an ongoing process of drawing, using my body of work as source material. I am interested in how practice, as drawing, might invest architecture with poiēsis, gleaned from drawing’s inherent open-ness. I am looking for aspects of practice that are irresolute, smudged and potential, qualities that cross between drawing and building, and inflect both. I suggest that this space of active crossing, between drawing and building, is where an architecture of open poiēsis is situated, where gestures, materiality and space, in practice, coalesce as an open work.

This is a reflective project, drawing from over twenty-five years of work, spanning from student projects through to architectural and academic practice. Evidence in this practice; drawing, building; marks, atmospheres, are thought to jostle together within a cloud of relations. The research charts ‘formative forces’ in this cloud and distils them as a set of strategies for future work. These inform a sfumato practice that draws in an open way, investigating the active space between drawing and building. This PhD contributes to understandings of practice as research, as a poiētic lens on what it draws, draws with and draws from.

Friday 2 June 2017

Mani Williams
PhD Architecture & Design
Let's Track! Strategies to establish active people tracking in workplaces
10am
Audience to arrive by 9.45am. Strictly no entry after 10am
Project Room 2, Level 2

This research presents a user-centric approach to establish active people tracking in workplaces.

With advanced tracking technologies becoming accessible, more businesses and organisations are tempted to experiment with the new trend of people tracking for management and planning purposes. Which system to use, what to do with the data and how to get the staff on board are common questions that the managements have little experience and precedence to look up. These questions point to fundamental issues in adapting data-driven people analytics in the workplace. My research addresses these questions with three targeted real world case studies.

The original contribution of my research is two-fold. Firstly, the people tracking system and analytics I developed demonstrated the technical capability to provide real time insights to workspace design, project management and human resources management applications. Secondly through reference to my three case studies I argue that a user-centric approach is critical for the successful integration and adaptation of people tracking systems and analytics into real world workplace practices.

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Robert Simeoni
PhD Architecture & Design
Capturing: The language of Robert Simeoni
10am
Audience to arrive by 9.45am. Strictly no entry after 10am
Ramp and Foyer, Level 1

The intent of this study is the exploration and documentation of the relationship between observation and design. Through examination of the process within my practice, within my mind, the study attempts to delve into, and further elucidate the winding passage from observed moment (‘catalogue’) to realised design (building), and to just see, with greater clarity, that which lies beyond the observation.

Expressed through a collection of images and observations of spatial interventions that, at first glance, may appear to be ad hoc and unplanned, upon closer investigation exhibit a complex and poetic realisation.

This inquiry into observed moments takes on a further expansion through the collected moments; candid photographs of architectural muses. A desire to show what I see, to understand my own language, to share the language, spoken over time, learnt over time, through observation, the looking, seeing, to see, I have seen that somewhere once before, twice before, losing count, the memories grow, captured, returned to, my constant companions, returning to me when needed.

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Jim Barbour
PhD Architecture & Design
Spatial Audio Engineering: Exploring Height in Acoustic Space
2.30pm
Audience to arrive by 2.15pm. Strictly no entry after 2.30pm
SIAL Sound Studio , Level 1

Techniques for recording and reproducing an immersive 3D audio experience are evolving rapidly as new technologies and new delivery platforms emerge for music recordings, sound art installations, museum and gallery exhibits, and immersive cinema formats. A creative practitioner in this field requires a broad range of skills: spatial composition, creating unique sounds specifically intended for use in a spatial sound work; spatial sound design, using existing sounds and manipulating them into 3D acoustic space; and spatial recording, capturing the location and movement of sounds in space and the sonic identity of acoustic spaces.

As a lifelong passionate listener and professional audio engineer, the foundation of my transition into spatial audio engineering was the integration of psycho-acoustic theories of spatial hearing into my focused listening. This practice-led research was listener focused, constructing a unique 3D loudspeaker array, developing innovative techniques for spatial recording and establishing a repertoire of electronic and acoustic spatialisation techniques. The research identified height in acoustic space as critical to our discernment of sonic immersion. A series of spatial sound works are presented and analysed for the perceptual effectiveness of these spatialisation techniques, with particular attention paid to the use of 3D space as an aesthetic parameter.

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Cameron Bruhn
PhD Architecture & Design
The alter ego of editorial intelligence
2.30pm
Audience to arrive by 2.15pm. Strictly no entry after 2.30pm
Foyer, Level 1

This research follows the trajectory of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design from 2003-2017. It documents my contribution to Australian built environment writing, editing and publishing, situating my practice as a site of innovation across disciplines and mediums. The key collaborators, critical tendencies and organisational themes of the practice are understood through a horizontal and vertical dissection of my editorial approach within the matrix of publications, events and programs. The personification of the three editorial streams of the practice through three speculative titles reveals the alter ego of my editorial intelligence.

The research reconsiders and reframes my body of work providing evidence of the mastery and the practice’s contribution to local and international knowledge in architecture, landscape architecture and interior design.

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